On View: Art and Civil Rights Via the 1960s at the Brooklyn Museum

The 1960s were synonymous with widespread social, political and cultural change. People from all races and ethnicities took to the streets — and to the art studios — to make their voices heard.  To mark the 50th anniversary of the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Brooklyn Museum takes a rare look at how art interpreted and influenced the movement in Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties.

 

'Soldiers and Students' by Jacob Lawrence, 1962. (Photo: © 2013 The Jacob and Gwendolyn Lawrence Foundation, Seattle / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York)

‘Soldiers and Students’ by Jacob Lawrence, 1962. (Photo: © 2013 The Jacob and Gwendolyn Lawrence Foundation, Seattle / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York)

The Civil Rights movement ignited a generation of activists and artists. From Pop Art and Minimalism to abstraction, assemblage and photography, the exhibition embraces a diverse range of styles. Each of the 66 participating artists has put their creative stamp on the era’s political activism and demand for identity, equality and liberation.

Sections include Integrate/Educate; American Nightmare; Presenting Evidence; Politicizing Pop, Black is Beautiful; Sisterhood; Global Liberation; and Beloved Community.

Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties is on view at the Brooklyn Museum through July 6, 2014.

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